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Posted by Noelle Morris on September 05 2017 at 5:47 PM
Isn’t it fabulous to be a teacher today? We get to approach instruction in an innovative way, blend methods and delivery, ask questions, complete formative assessments, and differentiate all while observing in real-time the return on our instructional investments. High-fives to everyone. You are getting ready to throw up a high-five or fist bump, right? Don’t leave me hanging.Wait, I have started rambling in blog-time excitement without taking a moment to introduce myself and set the tone. See,…
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Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:36 PM
People tend to remember their teachers by one easily identifiable look or frequently used statement.  My seventh grade history teacher Ms. Nedd’s favorite phrase was “don’t be redundant!”  When my students think of me in the future, I’m sure that the word “elaborate” will ring through their heads.  This is because I constantly struggled with getting my students to better develop their paragraphs when writing.  Then, my principal introduced me to the MEL-Con writing…
Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:35 PM
Explicit instruction is one of the keys to obtaining desired results from my students.  This includes keeping students informed of the amount of time they have to complete a given class assignment.  Historically, as many teachers do, I used a ‘kitchen timer’ when keeping track of the allotted time for class work.  Though it served its purpose, the kitchen timer had a few downfalls.  First, use of this timer required more work on my behalf.  I either had to circulate the…
Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:34 PM
“Robert, where is your homework?”  “I couldn’t do it because I didn’t understand it.”  This timeless homework excuse never gets tired.  But as teachers, how can we differentiate between those students who use this line to simply avoid completing their assignments and those who truly misunderstood the content taught?   One way to address this issue is by using Exit Slips.  I was introduced to exit slips through Scholastic’s READ 180 program.  Though I have created…
Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:32 PM
I thought being the 4th and all, it would be fitting to turn you onto a George Washington resource.  Appleseeds is produced by the publishers of Cobblestone magazine.  They're both super magazines and worth getting classroom subscriptions to.  And of course you can always order back issues.  Pretty handy, huh?
Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:31 PM
So I have a whole project we did around I Spy in class.  I've taken photos of it three times and misplaced those pics, yes you guessed it, three times.  My goal is to find them so you can see them tomorrow.  In the meantime, take a look at these I Spy games.  We did them as a class and the kids loved them.
Posted by oldRobertold on April 09 2009 at 3:30 PM
Of course my computer is under the impression that the I Spy pics I have should remain on the CD along with a never-ending ERROR message.  So let me paint you a picture.    We took our dollhouse and the kids took turns filling it with everything from plastic dinosaurs to strands of ribbon.  Anything we could get our hands on was fair game.  When we were done we took a number of pictures and mounted them on butcher paper.  Next up was writing various…
Posted by oldMargaretold on April 09 2009 at 3:27 PM
This posting is short and sweet so you can spend some time exploring the Library of Congress website.  It is absolutely loaded with resources.  On the off chance you check it out and feel overwhelmed, take a look at the historic images. (Go to Digital Collections.)  The next time you start a new topic or theme, consider printing out an image and voila, you're using primary source materials.  OK, go enjoy.
Posted by oldMargaretold on April 09 2009 at 3:20 PM
If I had a penny for every time one of you guys wrote me asking, "So Margaret, do you have any good sites to help teach about the Ice Age?"  I would be a poor man, but that's beside the point.  You should head on over to Virtual Museum Canada: A Journey to a New Land and click on Primary Level.  You'll find some pretty useful resources like the interactive stickers game.  It can be used as a writing prompt.
Posted by oldMargaretold on April 09 2009 at 3:19 PM
I heard an interesting interview on NPR this afternoon.  It involved using nanotechnology to replicate the sticking ability of geckos for tape.  Not only would the stuff stick to virtually everything, it would be self-cleaning.  While some of the practical uses are fascinating, I can't help but think how many uses this stuff would have in the classroom.
Posted by oldJessica_Jenningsold on April 09 2009 at 3:17 PM
When the kids are sitting down to write in their journals I like to make sure the alphabet is posted in more than one place.  The pics here show our main alphabet posted along a wall that is visible to all students.  There are alphabet charts on at least two other walls and miniature versions in stand-up plexiglass holders on their tables.