×
Reading Nation

Spotlight on the Latest Trends in Education

Search blog posts
Narrow
TO
Posted by Community Manager on October 03 2017 at 9:35 AM
Reading can feed the imagination. When I read, my mind travels through time, around the world, and connects me with the extraordinary. I find a comfortable spot that is well lit and often secluded. I chat with people who also enjoy reading, and they suggest what I should read next, and we often swap books. For me, reading is part of my daily life—nothing extraordinary. I love reading and it provides with me an escape, emotional and intellectual growth, and it brings me pleasure.As a teacher, I…
Posted by Community Manager on October 02 2017 at 11:06 AM
The appreciation of reading can be broken down into five stages. These stages build on one another as we grow and learn. They deepen our understanding of the written word:Stage 1: Reading brings enjoyment. We see this very early on as we look at picture books, read with our parents and teachers, or share oral manifestations like nursery rhymes.Stage 2: Reading becomes a vicarious experience. We start to think about the adventures or experiences that we read about and begin imagining…
Posted by on September 11 2017 at 1:57 PM
The start of the school year is a good time to reflect on reading goals for students. And where goals are discussed, reading levels, word counts, and subject tags are not far behind. Let’s separate two kinds of reading: instructional and independent. The kind of reading you find in academic texts and assessments requires classroom preparation, close understanding, and focused comprehension. When kids choose their own reading material, that book or website is viewed with different expectations,…
Posted by Community Manager on September 11 2017 at 1:54 PM
Educators can list many obstacles to independent reading. Rows of books and lists of assigned texts overwhelm students. Reading in silence feels lonely and cut off from peers. Teachers and students have to square academic expectations and appropriateness with kids’ genuine interests and cultural references. Young people may fear being called out on their ignorance, and often lack role models who prize discovery over certainty. With all these hurdles, how can schools overcome kids’ resistance to…
Posted by Francie CAO on November 30 2016 at 11:15 AM
My favorite books to share with students who struggle…and to help me be a kinder and more thoughtful person.I'm known in my families, the one at home and the one at work, as a practicing bibliotherapist. As a teacher and parent, when my kids were faced with a problem themselves or needed to be more empathetic when others were challenged, I went to the books. Here are four of my favorites: Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt (Nancy Paulsen Books). The protagonist is a girl who we know…
Posted by Community Manager on June 30 2016 at 2:56 PM
Struggles and success come in all shapes and sizes. Kaylynn, a student from California, Borum, a refugee from Cambodia, and Jorvorskie, a football player in the NFL, , all have something in common. They struggled with reading, but they went on to become winners in the annual HMH 180 Awards. They learned to have a growth mindset and had the perseverance to overcome obstacles in school and improve their reading skills.    Borum came to the U.S. from Cambodia in September 2012 when he…
Posted by Community Manager on June 01 2015 at 5:11 PM
By Allison Bruhn, Assistant Professor of Special Education, University of IowaHaving consulted and trained many schools in designing, implementing, and evaluating Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS), one thing I am finding is a new focus on developing growth mindsets.  That said, I’ve had teachers and administrators ask how MTSS and growth mindsets can co-exist when they seem to be competing initiatives?  Generally, this debate centers around the MTSS framework for Positive…
Posted by Francie CAO on May 13 2014 at 9:43 PM
Walter Dean Myers, whose books are treasured by students, and teachers asked the question above in an article for the New York Times. As a booklover and a voracious reader personally and professionally. I’ve adopted the mantra books hold up mirrors to ourselves and windows to the world. With that in mind, all of us at Scholastic are always on the lookout for the best nonfiction and fiction, classic and contemporary. Walter Dean Myers based his thoughtful piece on a study by the Cooperative…
Posted by Francie CAO on January 25 2014 at 2:50 PM
While I don’t make resolutions, I think January’s a great month to reset goals. One of mine is to include more nonfiction in my "just for fun" reading.  Our students are expected to be able to handle an array of informational text types and I’ll be reading nonfiction texts that I expect will not only inform me but inspire. Here are two books I’m reading:                  The recent release of PISA scores for students around the world has us…
Posted by Community Manager on October 21 2013 at 2:40 PM
  Scholastic released a study conducted in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on the Common Core. 20,000 teachers participated in our third wave of Primary Sources: America’s Teachers on Teaching in an era of change.                                          One finding…